High winds and fire danger today, but no burn ban in Creek County

The National Weather Service has issued what they call a “Red Flag Warning” for Creek County, which includes high winds of nearly 40 mph, and a warning that “any fires that develop will likely spread rapidly.”

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Despite the danger, the situation doesn’t meet the criteria to institute a county-wide burn ban, accounting to County Commissioner Leon Warner. “There’s a process to declaring a burn ban,” Warner said. “(Creek County Emergency Management Director) Covey has to talk with all the fire departments, and there has to have been a lack of rain.” The previous burn ban near the end of January and into the first week of February was halted by the snowstorm that hit the area.

The National Weather Service says today’s Red Flag Warning will expire at 6:00 pm, but windy conditions are expected to persist through Wednesday, and develop into a thunderstorm that evening and continue to rain through Thursday. There’s a chance of snow on Thursday night, given the precipitation and cold weather.

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Next week will be a different story: as of right now, there could be as much as 3 inches of snow heading our way by the middle of next week.

Here’s the full National Weather Service Alert:

...RED FLAG WARNING IN EFFECT UNTIL 6 PM CST THIS EVENING FOR
VERY DRY AND WINDY CONDITIONS FOR AREAS NORTH OF INTERSTATE 44
IN NORTHEAST OKLAHOMA...

The National Weather Service in Tulsa has issued a Red Flag
Warning, which is in effect until 6 PM CST this evening.

* AFFECTED AREA...In Oklahoma, Washington, Nowata, Craig,
Ottawa, Tulsa, Rogers, and Creek counties.

* WIND...south at 15 to 25 gusting to near 40 mph.

* HUMIDITY...as low as 30 percent.

* TEMPERATURE...upper 60s to near 70.

* IMPACTS...any fires that develop will likely spread rapidly.
Outdoor burning is not recommended.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

A red flag warning means that a dangerous combination of weather
conditions and dry vegetation is expected within 24 hours,
favoring rapid growth and spread of any wildfires. The primary
weather factors include stronger winds, lower humidities, and
warmer temperatures.